How did the Simon Commission become a turning point in India's nationalist movement?

How did the Simon Commission become a turning point in India's nationalist movement?

The Simon Commission became a turning point in India's nationalist movement for the following reasons:

Question Answer
What was the Simon Commission? The Simon Commission was a group of seven British members of parliament appointed by the British government in 1927 to review and recommend changes to the constitutional arrangements in India.
Why was the Simon Commission controversial? The Simon Commission was controversial because it did not include any Indian members and was seen as a purely British initiative to control Indian affairs without consulting Indian leaders or representatives.
How did the Simon Commission become a turning point in India's nationalist movement? The Simon Commission became a turning point in India's nationalist movement because it led to widespread protests and boycotts by Indian political leaders and citizens. The failure of the British government to address the Indian demand for greater self-rule and representation ultimately led to the adoption of the Indian Independence Act of 1947, which granted India independence from British colonial rule.

1. Lack of Indian representation

The Simon Commission was an all-white British commission that was set up to review the constitutional arrangements in India. It did not include any Indian members, which was seen as a clear insult to the Indian people.

2. Widespread protests

The Indian National Congress, along with other political parties and organizations, boycotted the Simon Commission and organized widespread protests and demonstrations across the country. This showed the strength and unity of the Indian people in their struggle for self-rule.

3. Formation of the Nehru Report

In response to the Simon Commission, the Indian National Congress appointed a committee under the leadership of Jawaharlal Nehru to draft a constitution for India. The resulting report, known as the Nehru Report, advocated for complete independence and laid the foundation for the future Indian constitution.

4. British refusal to accept demands

The Simon Commission's report, published in 1930, recommended limited reforms to the Indian constitution, but fell far short of Indian demands for self-rule and independence. This led to the further radicalization of the Indian nationalist movement and the escalation of the struggle for independence.

5. Gandhi's call for complete independence

In 1929, Mahatma Gandhi called for complete independence from British rule in India, marking a significant shift in the Indian nationalist movement's goals and strategies. The Simon Commission's failure to address Indian demands for self-rule and independence helped to mobilize support for Gandhi's call for complete independence.

Overall, the Simon Commission marked a turning point in India's nationalist movement by exposing the British government's unwillingness to grant meaningful constitutional reforms and by mobilizing widespread support for complete independence. It also helped to lay the foundation for the future Indian constitution and set the stage for the final push for independence that culminated in 1947.

Read More: Second Notes

The Simon Commission, appointed in 1927 by the British government to review and recommend constitutional changes in India, marked a significant turning point in India's nationalist movement. The Commission, led by Sir John Simon, consisted entirely of British officials and was seen as an insult to the Indian people, who had been demanding greater representation and self-rule. The Commission's failure to include any Indian members, coupled with its recommendations for limited constitutional reforms, led to widespread protests and marked a shift in the Indian nationalist movement's goals and strategies. This article will explore in detail how the Simon Commission became a turning point in India's nationalist movement.

Lack of Indian representation

The Simon Commission's composition was entirely British, with no Indian representation, which was seen as a clear insult to the Indian people. The exclusion of Indian members from the Commission was seen as an affront to the Indian nationalist movement, which had been demanding greater representation and self-rule for decades. The Indian National Congress, the largest political party in India, boycotted the Commission, and other political parties and organizations joined in the protests. The exclusion of Indian members from the Commission exposed the British government's unwillingness to grant Indians a greater role in their own governance, leading to widespread disillusionment with British rule.

Widespread protests

The Simon Commission's arrival in India in 1928 was met with widespread protests and demonstrations. The Indian National Congress, along with other political parties and organizations, organized a boycott of the Commission and called for a hartal, or a general strike, across the country. Protests were held in major cities across India, with demonstrators demanding the inclusion of Indian members in the Commission and greater self-rule for the Indian people. The protests marked a significant shift in the Indian nationalist movement's goals and strategies, as the movement began to mobilize support around the demand for complete independence from British rule.

Formation of the Nehru Report

In response to the Simon Commission, the Indian National Congress appointed a committee to draft a constitution for India. The committee, led by Jawaharlal Nehru, produced the Nehru Report, which advocated for complete independence and laid the foundation for the future Indian constitution. The Nehru Report called for the establishment of a federal government with strong provincial autonomy, an end to British control over India's defense and foreign policy, and the establishment of a separate electorate for the Muslim community. The Nehru Report became the basis for the future Indian constitution and represented a significant shift in the Indian nationalist movement's goals and strategies.

British refusal to accept demands

The Simon Commission's report, published in 1930, recommended limited reforms to the Indian constitution, but fell far short of Indian demands for self-rule and independence. The report recommended the establishment of provincial councils with limited powers and the expansion of the electorate, but did not address Indian demands for complete independence or greater representation in the central government. The British government's refusal to accept Indian demands for self-rule and independence further radicalized the Indian nationalist movement, as the movement began to mobilize support for complete independence from British rule.

Gandhi's call for complete independence

In 1929, Mahatma Gandhi called for complete independence from British rule in India, marking a significant shift in the Indian nationalist movement's goals and strategies. Gandhi's call for complete independence was a response to the British government's failure to address Indian demands for self-rule and independence, as well as the growing radicalization of the Indian nationalist movement. Gandhi's call for complete independence galvanized the Indian people and helped to mobilize support for the final push for independence that culminated in 1947.

Overall, the Simon Commission became a turning point in India's nationalist movement by exposing the British government's unwillingness to grant meaningful constitutional reforms and by mobilizing widespread support for complete independence. The Commission's

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