What were the key features of Mahatma Gandhi's ideology and methods of resistance?

What were the key features of Mahatma Gandhi's ideology and methods of resistance?

Mahatma Gandhi was one of the most prominent leaders of the Indian independence movement. Here are some key features of his ideology and methods of resistance:

Key Features Methods of Resistance
Ahimsa (non-violence) Boycotts, strikes, civil disobedience, non-cooperation, fasting
Satyagraha (truth force) Peaceful resistance, seeking justice through moral and ethical means, non-violent direct action
Swaraj (self-rule) Challenging British rule and promoting Indian independence, promoting village-level self-governance and self-reliance
Equality and Social Justice Campaigns against untouchability, caste discrimination, and promoting gender equality and women's rights
Interfaith Harmony Encouraging cooperation and understanding between different religious communities, promoting religious tolerance and pluralism

1. Satyagraha

Gandhi's philosophy of non-violent resistance, called Satyagraha, was the cornerstone of his approach to social and political change. It emphasized the power of truth and moral force to achieve change, rather than the use of violence or force.

2. Ahimsa

Another key element of Gandhi's ideology was ahimsa, or non-violence. He believed that violence only begets more violence and that non-violent resistance was a more effective means of achieving change.

3. Swaraj

Gandhi advocated for the concept of swaraj, or self-rule, as the ultimate goal of Indian independence. He believed that India needed to achieve economic, political, and cultural independence from British rule.

4. Satyagrahi

Gandhi believed that every person had the potential to be a Satyagrahi, or practitioner of non-violent resistance. He believed that it was important to educate and empower ordinary people to participate in the struggle for independence.

5. Civil Disobedience

Gandhi's methods of resistance included civil disobedience, or the deliberate refusal to obey unjust laws. He led campaigns such as the Salt Satyagraha, where he and thousands of others marched to the sea to make salt in defiance of British salt laws.

6. Constructive Programme

In addition to direct resistance, Gandhi also advocated for a "constructive programme" of social and economic reforms, such as education, sanitation, and the promotion of Indian industries.

Overall, Mahatma Gandhi's ideology and methods of resistance were rooted in non-violence, self-rule, and empowering ordinary people to participate in the struggle for independence.

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